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Who made the things that you buy?

by Shannon Riesenfeld April 26, 2017

Who made the things that you buy?

It's Fashion Revolution Week!

If you're like me, your closet might be full of clothes made in factories in China, India, and Bangladesh.  Made my women and men who work long hours in dreadful conditions, for very little (or no) pay.  Our desire for cheap, fast fashion has created an industry that is not only harmful for the garment workers, but it's detrimental to our environment too.  We want more, more, more at the lowest cost possible... and the only people profiting are those at the very top.

On April 24th, 2013, the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,138 people and injuring many more.  This factory is so similar to many used by major clothing brands in Asia and it's come to symbolize the issues surrounding the garment industry.

During Fashion Revolution Week we remember the victims of the factory collapse and pledge to make a change:

- to slow down our consumption of un-ethically made goods

- to ask "who made my clothes?" and demand more transparency in the fashion industry

- to demand better working conditions and fair pay for those who make the things we buy

- to value quality over quantity 

You can learn more at http://fashionrevolution.org

Seeking out fair trade companies is one way to shop ethically and DO GOOD with your purchasing power!  When you support small, family-owned businesses that employ artisans, you're making a positive impact in the lives of many.

Here at Mango + Main, connecting you to the artisans who make every single thing that you purchase is our passion!

You can be sure that each item is made with love by an artisan who earns a fair wage, works in a comfortable environment (either from home or among their peers), and is valued and treasured.

We believe in

- slow fashion

- small batches

- authentic artistry

- using local materials

- preserving cultural trends and traditional methods.

No factories allowed.

Here are two of our beautiful artisan partners in Kigali, Rwanda named Grace and Charlotte!  They love to use their incredible skills with a foot pedal sewing machine to create bags, aprons, skirts, and more!  They belong to the Umucyo Sewing Cooperative and enjoy going to work every day to sew, laugh, and pray with their friends.  

Thank you so much for purchasing their unique, handmade products and for sharing them with your friends and family!





Shannon Riesenfeld
Shannon Riesenfeld

Author

Fair trade enthusiast, artisan advocate, and mom of 4 living in Annapolis, Maryland. I love traveling the world, meeting new people, and learning about different cultures... but when I'm at home you can find me biking the trails or kayaking on the river with my kids!


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